Reminder: So You Think You Can Write Final Submission Deadline Dec. 15!

Early in November, Harlequin’s editorial team held So You Think You Can Write, a week of social media events to teach aspiring authors more about Harlequin and what it takes to write a romance novel.

As part of SYTYCW, we set out a final writing challenge: submit a synopsis and first chapter of your manuscript to ucanwrite[at]harlequin[dot]ca by 6:00pm EDT on December 15th and you will get a response by our editorial team by January 31st! That means the deadline is this Wednesday!

Some additional notes about submitting to SYTYCW:

1) One entry per person. If someone sends more than one submission, only the first will be evaluated.

2) You can submit with a story aimed at ANY Harlequin imprint, not just series.

3) Work-in-progress manuscripts are okay–you don’t need to have the book completed yet. Just keep in mind if you get a request for more in January, be prepared to have something ready pretty soon.

4) please add “SYTYCW First Chapter & Synopsis” to the subject line of your submission email

For more blog posts, chat transcripts, etc. from SYTYCW, visit the Harlequin Blog and the eHarlequin.com Community (in the Write Stuff forum). And as always, the Writing Guidelines on eHarlequin.com.

Good luck!

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Comments ( 25 )
  1. Ann Mayburn
    January 27, 2011 at 6:25 pm
    Reply

    I’m having a mild panic attack because I realized that I did not put down what line I was targeting with my submission. It’s very clear by the first part of my query letter that it’s a historical western romance, but I’m freaking out at the thougth that I disqualified myself with this oversight.

    Am I driving myself into a hissy over nothing, as my husband claims, or have I forever destroyed any chance with Haralquin and have relegated myself to the submissions junk box forever?

    Thank you for taking the time to talk me off the ledge,

    Ann

  2. Chopsy
    January 27, 2011 at 8:03 pm
    Reply

    Got my form rejection. I wonder if the wording was specific to me or just a general term you use for all rejections? The reason I ask is because I think the comment about the story not being strong enough is a bit harsh if, for example, the story was actually rejected for the fact it doesn’t fit into any of HQ’s lines or genres. Specific feedback would have been useful but I realise you were probably snowed under. I just think the rejection letter should either be specific to each application or so general that an author can’t assume anything from it. My writing may well not have been strong enough (to quote the letter) but I have not received the intended critique in the message because I don’t know if those words are with regard to my story specifically or were just said to everyone who was rejected.

  3. Ann Mayburn
    January 27, 2011 at 8:43 pm
    Reply

    Chopsy- That’s their form letter. If you go here:
    http://community.eharlequin.com/forums/write-stuff/anyone-hear-editor-after-entering-so-you-think-you-can-write-contest

    You can see the responses others have received and many received the same form letter. Don’t feel slighted because you didn’t get a personalized rejection. They probably have less than two dozen people looking at over a thousand entries.

    For feedback, you’ll probably find it a lot more useful to join a good critique group focusing on writing for Harlaquin. Either way, good luck with your future writing and don’t let one rejection get you down. Lord knows I have enough rejections to wallpaper my study. 😉 But, I also have three book contracts among all those rejections so don’t give up!

  4. Chopsy
    January 29, 2011 at 1:39 am
    Reply

    Hi Ann

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. Just for clarity, I don’t actually mind the wording so much as I mind having to assume it applies to my story, if you know what I mean. My tale started with my heroine (a cop) being caught in a gun fight. It is a romance but its rather gritty I guess. So you see, I do wonder if its the tone of the story or actually my writing that let me down. Generic comments don’t help much, although of course I understand why it happens. From an author’s point of view, it seems an awful lot of effort just to end up more confused about any ability they may have than before they started! I’ve had rejections and successes with smaller pubs but HQ is my next goal. Fingers crossed eh? Thanks again.

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